Supercomputers Are Also Used in Africa | Philip Emeagwali | Famous Computer Inventors

Supercomputers Are Also Used in Africa | Philip Emeagwali | Famous Computer Inventors


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Supercomputers Are Used in Africa] [Why I Won the Top Prize in Supercomputing] I won the top award
in supercomputing in 1989 and I did so for my contributions
to the development of the practical parallel supercomputer.
After years of being denied credit for my inventions,
I learned to take the credit for my invention
of practical parallel processing, the technology that underpins
every supercomputer. I owe it to the 12-year-old
writing an inventor biography on Philip Emeagwali
to keep the credit for my contributions that he or she is reporting on.
That was the reason I spoke up for myself back in 1989
and showcased my contributions to the development of the computer. [Efforts to Sabotage My Research] Success breeds jealousy and haters.
Becoming a famous supercomputer scientist
was like putting a large target on my back.
Like any prominent black inventor of the past, I had doubters
who envied me and worked tirelessly and anonymously to discredit my science.
In 1989, I won the top prize in the field of supercomputing
and did so for discovering how to solve a grand challenge problem
and, specifically, for figuring out how to solve them across
an ensemble of 65,536 processors. In 1989,
I was the supercomputer scientist behind my discovery of how to harness
a new parallel supercomputer and how to use that new technology
to solve the toughest real-world problems,
such as fluid dynamical calculations called general circulation models
of atmospheric and oceanic flows that are used to predict global warming
and petroleum reservoir simulators that are used to recover more crude oil
and natural gas that are buried one mile deep
and within an oilfield that is the size of a town.
As the inventor of practical parallel supercomputing,
I was the only person that could deliver the first public lecture
that answers that grand challenge question.
Being the inventor created deep grooves of my ownership
of practical parallel supercomputing and, most importantly,
I was the only supercomputer scientist of the 1980s
that can show someone else how to massively parallel process
and how to do so across a new internet that is a new global network of
65,536 processors. That command of materials
and deep knowledge of mathematics, physics, and supercomputing
and that control, via emails, of my 64 binary thousand processors
made my lectures on massively parallel supercomputing
more authoritative as well as compelling. [Why I Invented Practical Parallel Supercomputing
Alone] As a research mathematician,
I stood out because I was the only person
that recorded the world’s fastest speed in supercomputing
and did so while solving the initial-boundary value problem
of mathematical physics. That achievement was the reason
I was the only person that won the top prize
in the field of supercomputing and won it alone and did so when
up to fifty persons are teaming up to win that prize.
A century ago, the average scientific paper
had only one author. Today, the average scientific paper
has six authors. The paper on the experimental discovery of
the Higgs Boson had 3,061 co-discoverers
of the Higgs Boson. A boson is an elementary particle
that is believed to be responsible for all physical forces. [Supercomputers Are Also Used in Africa] For my country of birth, Nigeria,
poverty cannot be reduced by searching for
a huge deposit of crude oil and natural gas
and discovering it in Sokoto of the far northeastern region
of Nigeria. Poverty alleviation
cannot be achieved from recovering only 50 percent of that crude oil deposit
and then paying 40 percent of that 50 percent as exploration royalty
to a foreign oil company. That’s like recovering only 30 percent
of the crude oil and natural gas that was originally discovered.
Economic growth for oil producing nations,
such as Nigeria, resides in having the brain power
to earn the remaining seventy percent of the potential revenue
from the Niger Delta oilfields of the southeastern region of Nigeria. The
first step in alleviating poverty in Africa
is to increase Africa’s intellectual capital and do so by reversing
the brain drain from Africa to the United States,
and do so by also attracting skilled non-Africans,
such as African-Americans, to live and work in Africa,
and do so by Africans being at the frontier of human knowledge
and Africans being at that unknown world
where African innovators could imagine the unimaginable. [New Knowledge is the Lifeblood of Humanity] Discoveries and inventions
are to science and technology what new songs and new movies
are to the entertainment industries. The invention is to technology
what the new song is to music. Inventions make living easier
for everybody. Discoveries make the world a better place,
and a more knowledgeable one. Thank you. I’m Philip Emeagwali. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *