10 BRITISH SLANG VERBS & PHRASAL VERBS | Lingoda Language Marathon (€567 refund!!!) #Spon

10 BRITISH SLANG VERBS & PHRASAL VERBS | Lingoda Language Marathon (€567 refund!!!) #Spon


(peaceful music) – Hello, everyone, and welcome
back to English with Lucy. You guys have requested it. I’ve had so many requests
for another slang, British slang video,
so I thought I’d cover British slang verbs and also some slang phrasal verbs as well. Really, really useful. Before we get started,
this video is sponsored by the Lingoda Language Marathon. It’s an amazing opportunity, but I’m not going to talk about it now. I’m going to talk about it at the end. So you can click to the time
that you see on your screen now and I will have all the
information for you. Basically, a specific
number of you will be able to do three months
of daily English classes. It’s 567 euros, but if you
complete the whole marathon, you get all of your money back, 567 euros refunded back to you. So click on the timestamp on the screen to find out more information, or just wait til the end of the video. Let’s get started. Or should I say let’s crack on. We’ll talk about that one in a minute. So, lots of lovely slang,
predominantly British, although you will find some
in Australia, for example, and maybe the United States, but most of them are more used in the UK. But in the UK, you will
definitely need to understand these words if you’re going
to integrate with natives. I’m also going to chuck in, include, lots of extra bonus British slang words. Oh my God, that’s hard to say. And I will explain them as I go along. The first one is ‘to fancy’, and I have mentioned this one before, but it’s so important that
I’m going to mention it again. You need to know this verb. You need to know it,
we use it all the time. It has two meanings, it can mean to be romantically
interested in somebody, so an example could be,
I fancied Will for ages and I was gobsmacked when I found out that he fancied me too.’ ‘Gobsmacked’ means shocked, speechless. Now, the other way that we use this verb is to express that we want
or we feel like something. I could say, I really fancy
fish and chips tonight. And that means I really
feel like fish and chips. I want fish and chips. Or in a question, do you
fancy going to the pub? Do you want to go to the pub? Do you feel like going to the pub? Now, note I said, do you want to go, but do you fancy going? Do you feel like going? So, remember that if
you use it in an exam. Right, the next one, number
two is a phrasal verb. It is to dob somebody in. To dob somebody in. This means to report a person
to somebody of authority for a wrongdoing. So, if somebody’s done something wrong, you inform someone in a
position of authority. For example, I can’t
believe Ellie dobbed me in to the teacher for
skipping class yesterday. She dobbed me in. She informed the teacher, who is in a position
of authority, over me. She told on me. She dobbed me in. I remember at school, if
somebody was being mean, I’d say, I’m gonna dob you in, which means I’m going to tell the teacher. (chuckles) Right, the next one, number
three, another phrasal verb. This one is to chat somebody up. To chat somebody up. Now, this can mean two
things in British English. The first one is the more common use and the second one is
slightly less common, it’s kind of used in a more sarcastic way. The first meaning is to talk to somebody in a flirtatious way. To talk to somebody flirtatiously. So, if somebody’s paying me
lots and lots of compliments, I might say, are you chatting me up? Are you flirting with me? I think in America you
might say to hit on. Are you hitting on me? Are you chatting me up? The other meaning is to talk
to somebody persuasively, normally with ulterior motives. For example, say a bouncer
wouldn’t let us into a club, I’ll say, I’ll see if I can chat her up. It doesn’t mean I’m
going to flirt with her. It means I’m going to try and
be really, really nice to her to try and persuade her to let us in. The next one, to be up for something. We use this all the time. Are you up for it? I’m up for it. She’s up for it. The meaning is very simple. It means to want to do something. So, if I am up for going
out, I want to go out, I feel like going out. So, if I say, we’re
going ice skating tonight if you’re up for it, it means we’re going ice skating tonight if you want to come too. It’s very, very informal. Next, another one we use all the time. I use it so frequently, and when I talk to non-native speakers, I try and carefully select my verbs so that I avoid using slangs so that they can understand me better, but pop is the one that I struggle with because I just use it all the time. And pop, the meaning is very simple. Once you understand it, you will be fine. It means to go somewhere usually
for a short period of time and often without notice. So, without notice is
you haven’t advised or the place or the people that
you’re going to go there, you’re going to visit. We often use it with a preposition. I’m just popping out. I’m just going outside for
a short period of time. Or I’m just gonna pop to the shops. Do you want anything? I’m just going to go to the shops. Do you need anything? Or if I say, do you mind
if I pop in for a minute? It means do you mind if I
quickly visit your house for a second? So it’s normally something
spontaneous, unplanned, short period of time, but
it basically just means go. Number six, to go on about. This means to talk continuously
and to talk too much. It’s teetering, it’s only
just on the negative side. So, if I say, ugh, what’s
she going on about again, it means what’s she
talking about continuously and too much again? But sometimes it’s used in
quite an affectionate way. What are you going on about? What’s he going on about? But we sometimes forget the going bit, so what are you on about? What’s he on about? Be prepared to hear people say on about instead of to go on about. Number seven, another phrasal
verb, very important one. Can also just be a verb on
its own, it is to faff around, or you can shorten it
to faff, just to faff. It’s not a phrasal verb in this case. It’s got two meanings,
both are quite similar. The first meaning, the most common one is to spend time doing unimportant things and avoid what you really should be doing. A little bit like to procrastinate but with more emphasis on
doing the unimportant things. What have you been doing? Have you just been faffing around? I’m trying to say what have you been doing have you been avoiding all
the important tasks and just doing meaningless tasks? The other meaning is to
behave in a silly way, so if someone’s being a little bit stupid joking around too much I might say stop faffing around, stop messing
around it could also mean. Faff on its own, stop
faffing, oh I’m just faffing. We don’t necessarily have to
include that around there. Number eight, a verb on its own, to scoff, to scoff, and this in British English
slang means to eat something quickly and greedily. So if I see someone eating their
lunch really really quickly I might say you scoff that, you ate that quickly and greedily. It’s very informal, it’s quite friendly, it’s not necessarily negative if you use it in the right way. So I might say I scoffed my dinner and I went up for seconds. I ate my dinner really
quickly and greedily, and to go up for seconds means to return to the food with your plate to get a second helping. Number nine, another phrasal verb, this one is to crack on
with something or someone because there is a new
use for this phrasal verb. The first one is to proceed
or to progress quickly. You know at the beginning of my lessons I say right let’s get
started with the lesson. I could say let’s crack
on with the lesson, let’s get going, let’s proceed quickly and progress quickly too. Another newer meaning
for this phrasal verb is to flirt with somebody. So if I say I saw James
cracking on with Holly, it means I saw James at least attempting to flirt with Holly. I guess you could think that it’s somebody trying to progress with their relationship with a specific person but please remember that that one is very informal and it’s relatively new. The last one number 10 is to skive. It’s a verb on its own, but you can add the preposition off and say to skive off. It means the same thing. The definition is to avoid work, school, or a particular duty by leaving early or by just not going, staying away. I might say I’m going to
skive off this last lesson because the teacher just
reads off the slides. If they’re just reading off the sides, it means they’re just reading
the words on the presentation, they’re not adding anything extra. It was my pet hate. It was something that
particularly annoyed me at school and at university. Why just read me the presentation if I can read it myself at home. Let’s not go into too much detail. Or you could say, oh I think
Tom skived off work yesterday because he called in sick. He said he was ill on the telephone and then I saw him in the shopping centre. Naughty. Have you ever skived off work? Comment below if you have. Right, so those are the 10 British slang phrasal verbs and verbs. Why is that so hard to say? Now I’m gonna have a quick chat to you about the Lingoda language marathon. Really recommend you stay on because it’s such a great opportunity. The vast majority of you are here to improve your English. What better way than doing a
little bit every single day and then getting all your
money back at the end. Keep watching. Right so those that follow this channel will know that I work
with Lingoda very closely and very frequently and I regard them as one of
the very few trusted companies that I’m happy to work
with on a regular basis. I genuinely really like
their platform and services and that’s why I’m happy to promote it to my viewers and subscribers. Now quickly what Lingoda is, it’s an online language academy. They only use real
qualified native teachers. You can learn English,
German, French, and Spanish but on this occasion they’re
only running the marathon for English and German. Normally you have to sign
up on a subscription basis, meaning that what you
pay for is what you get, but every now and again, I think they last did one at
the beginning of the year, which I helped promote as well, which went really really well. They do a language marathon. Now, you know that I
don’t promote cramming and learning languages
really, really quickly. The best way you can
possibly learn a language is by doing it little and often, and one English class a
day, every single day, to me seemed like the absolute best way to learn English aside
from moving to England and just immersing
yourself in the culture, which is not that easy. So they did the language marathon before and because it was so successful and there were so many happy people, they’ve decided to run it again. You can get a 567 euro language course and on the condition that you
do complete every single class you get all of your money back. All of it. There’s also a half-marathon option, which I will discuss with you which involves getting half
of your money back as well if you don’t feel like 30 days every month is doable for you. So if you want to really
improve your English or even your German, you can take 30 group classes
every month for 3 months and if you do that, Lingoda will refund your course in full. They will give you all of your money back. Now, they’re a company. They’re not just going to
give classes away for free, so you do need to follow the golden rules. I’m informing you of everything I can, but it is your responsibility
to also familiarise yourself with the terms and conditions and make sure you completely understand the language marathon. If you’re doing the full language marathon and there are 30 days in the
month that you are doing it, you need to take a class every single day. You just need to do one
class a day for 30 days each month for 3 months. If you do the full marathon,
it’s 3 months long. You have to take 30 classes per month. You pay 189 euros per month. If you complete it, you get a 100% refund. So that’s a refund of 567 euros. If you want to do the half marathon, which is really recommended if you don’t think you can
commit to daily classes, it’s 3 months long. You do 15 classes per month, a maximum of 5 classes per week. You pay 99 euros per month and you get a 50% refund upon completion. So is the second one and
I had a chat with Lingoda about what really made the
people who completed the marathon succeed and the number
one thing that they said was booking classes 7 days in advance to make sure that you can fit them all in. There are also a couple
of other things you need. You need to use a laptop
or desktop computer. You can’t use smartphone or tablets. You need to use a laptop. You need to use the latest
version of Google Chrome or Mozilla and you must have
a stable internet connection. If you don’t have any
of those three things, don’t do it because you will
not enjoy the experience and you won’t be able
to have a smooth class with the rest of your group. Now I’m focusing mainly
on the English one, but I also wanted to let you know about the German offer as well. If you want to sign up
to the English marathon, you can sign up from this 2nd of April to the 19th of April ready
to start the marathon from the 2nd of May, because the first is a public holiday, up until the 31st of July. For German however, you’ve
got a little bit more time. You can sign up from the 2nd of April to the 18th of May, ready to
start from the 1st of June to the 31st of August. Now the entry fee was going to be 5 euros, but I’ve been given a
voucher code for you guys and if you use it that is discounted and all you have to pay is $0.50 and that’s only to process
the credit-card details, so don’t forget to use the voucher code. Payment wise it’s fairly simple. You pay the course fee every month, so that’s three total instalments. From the moment you pay the entry fee, you’ve then got 14 days to
either stop the first payment or refund the first payment. Once this has passed, you are committed to paying
for those three months. Now I’ve told you everything I can. I am fully endorsing this, I trust Lingoda and I think it is such
a valuable opportunity, but you must take responsibility
and familiarise yourself with the terms and conditions so that you don’t miss a trick, so that you get to complete
it absolutely perfectly, nothing goes wrong,
you get your money back and Bob’s your uncle. Oh a British expression came out. Lingoda have planned and organised this with a lot of love. I think it’s an incredibly generous offer. The places are limited. It’s not out there for
absolutely everyone. The spaces do fill up
really, really quickly so when you’re ready and if
you think that you’re dedicated and committed enough to
do it every single day or for 15 days for three months, click on the link below
and use the voucher code and let me know if you’ve done it because I’m really,
really excited for you. You will have committed
to something amazing and you will, you absolutely will improve your language skills. How could you not? 90 lessons and if you do it correctly, you get your money back. I think that is fantastic. Right guys, that’s it for me today. Don’t forget to connect with
me on all of my social media. I’ve got my Facebook, my
Instagram, and my Twitter, and I will see you soon
for another lesson. (upbeat music)

100 thoughts on “10 BRITISH SLANG VERBS & PHRASAL VERBS | Lingoda Language Marathon (€567 refund!!!) #Spon

  1. It says that is 90 classes in three months. my question is regarding to those months that have 31 days. Should I not take a class on the 31th day ? cause If I do wouldn't I be taking 2 extra classes ?

  2. Do not fall into this trap! Make sure you read all the absolutely ridiculous conditions on their website before you sign up. one especially interesting one reads: "The Participant agrees that the promotion will roll into a paid monthly subscription at the end of the marathon,…". Mind you that they will not send any email reminder about this at the end of the marathon period and they would refuse to refund or credit those classes.

    Lingoda service and support felt like a scam, I think it is absolutely not worth it, save your money!

  3. I'm not trying to chat you up, but I do think that your pretty blouse is very appropriate for such a lovely English rose 🙂
    Nice channel, BTW. Time to scarf down a little food. (I be greasin' , y'all)

  4. I lived in the UK for almost 2 years and the Bristol/Somerset slang really threw me off compared to the English I was used to hearing. By the way, looking gert lush! 😉

  5. Great videos! I'm an American in Missouri, and bit of an Anglophile. I love the differences between American and British English. I think it's strange that we Yanks say "scarf" instead of "scoff" when we talk about eating something quickly. Is it a difference in pronunciation that created the difference, as they sound very similar, especially with a British pronunciation.?

  6. do you say your 'g's? cuz i'm trying to audition for a british person in
    a play and i am 'southern' so i regularly drop my 'g's. (i really want
    this part so if anybody is out there and they know the anwer please tell
    me)

  7. What's a good definition of cheeky? I can think of what cheeky is, but I find it hard to describe. There's a certain bit of mischief behind it.

  8. LOL, scoff means something totally different in America. It's a mark of derision. To eat something greedily or quickly is "scarf".Scarf down, perhaps.

  9. Do you really regard these verbs as slang Lucy? To me they are more colloquial speaking. Do you know what Lucy? You don't just LOOK like an angel you ARE an angel…lol. Thanks for all your excellent and useful lessons! /Maggie from Sweden

  10. My british coworker always using these slangs and i'm like what do you mean?!

    i also love it when you give examples in that authentic british accent , keep it up.

  11. I wonder if Americans use the verb "scarf" for eating food quickly ("she scarfed down dinner") because they misheard the British use of "scoff"?

  12. Dob (somebody) in – "what" never heard of it or used the word in my 60 years living in the UK, must be another one of those southern words again!

  13. 2.48 I would say the most common word we would say is “snitch” instead of “dob”, just depends which region of the UK you come from.

  14. it's very good way to build up Vocabulary thanks for make it in very easy way to understand and learn fast and I wanna tell you one thing could you a make video to learn fast and easiest way.

  15. I think “to dob (somebody) in” is similar to “to turn (somebody) in” in American English.

    I’ve heard it in House, I believe.

  16. 1. To fancy (you feel like, you want, you like)
    -i fancied him since last year.

    2. To dob ( report your wrongdoings)
    – Lucy dobbed me yesterday.

    3. To chat up ( American says 'to hit on') =talking to someone persuasively
    -are you chatting me up?

    4. To be up for something =to want to do something
    – are u up for skating tonight?

    5. To pop =to go somewhere usually for a short time, often without notice
    -im just gonna pop to the shop,do u have anything to

    6. To go on about =to talk continuously and too much about
    -whats he going on about

    7. To faff around
    =to spend time doing unimportant thing (a bit like to procrastinate but with more emphasis on doing the unimportant thing)
    – what have u been doing, were u faffing around?
    =to behave in a silly way
    -stop faffing arond

    8. To scoff =to eat something quickly and greedily
    – wow u scoff that, u ate that very quickly.
    Formal – I scoff my dinner and went to study afterwards.

    9. To crack on with (something or someone) =to proceed or progress quickly informal
    = to flirt with somebody

    10. To skive (off)
    =to avoid duties by leaving early
    -im gonna skive off for this last season.

  17. Lucy you like my daughter but I,m still ur 45 yrs student keep it up I hope you be principal 1 day

  18. You are such a smart and charismatic teacher. I invite you to learn Portuguese in order to teach British English to Brazilian people. Unfortunately, in America In America, American English predominates.

  19. in Argentina, TO CHAT (SOMEBODY) UP, is "CHAMUYAR" and TO BE UP FOR SOMETHING is "PINTAR"… The last one is kinda weird because "PINTAR" means TO PAINT xD

  20. Thank you miss Lucy, it is really wonderful efforts which you doing. Truly helping me to cracked on with the customers in a pub where I work. Nepalese born

  21. lets go for poppi g it …she really dobed me in to the teaacher .yr he is a flirt guy and he is chatting yiu up and spread around …oooh your exams are near and yiu are paffinh around ..you axting in a very silly way …please you are no spring chicken …i was very hungry i scoffed

  22. In the morning I was FANCYING to SKIVE OFF school so while everyone was calmly eating their breakfast I SCOOFED it and then began to CHAT UP my mom who wanted to DOB me IN to dad who was POPPING to the restroom but I kept GOING ON ABOUT and was nicely CRACKING ON WITH IT when my sister interrupted me and said she was also UP FOR IT finally mom agreed and after mom and dad left we both FAFFED AROUND the whole day!!!…it was much fun🤪
    (Hope Lucy sees it)

  23. Hii ma'am! Truely I like your fluency and it's my great desire speaking like you. So I request you to help me and show me easy way to get fluency in english.
    Have a blast ma'am ang happy Navaratri

  24. Thank you very much Lovely Lucy for these video lessons. I truly adore them, clearly I am not faffing around by spending some time watching them.

  25. Hello , is it possible to include in this video or the previous one , some few seconds for some British TV shows using those slangs ? Thanks a lot…. really love your videos 👍 👏🎈

  26. Thank you very much. The other day I had a meeting but I didn't want to go. Then I met a friend and I wanted to show my new English slang vocabulary. I wanted to say "I want to skive off my meeting, but I had forgot the word. I tried to remember it but it was useless. Now I watch this video one more time to reinforce this list of words.

  27. Türkçeleri: (Turkish words of them)
    1- to fancy= a)hoşlanmak b)canı istemek

    2- to dob so. in= ispiyonlamak

    3- to chat so. up= a)asılmak b)kafalamak

    4- to be up for stg.= istemek

    5- to pop swh.= uğramak

    6- to go on about= zırvalamak

    7- to faff around= a)haytalık etmek b)sululuk yapmak

    8- to scoff= tıkınmak

    9- to crack on with= a)girişmek b)kırıştırmak

    10-to skive (off)=kırmak (okulu kırmak, işi kırmak)

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